A super weird and not very Christian thing that my husband and I do is watch a reality dating show called Love Island (The beginning of that sentence was scary, huh?). Yes, we have a guilty pleasure in watching what are typically “non-Christians” trying to find “love” on national television. We yell at the TV, telling each character what to do and how to act, because we know what decisions are right, right? The funny thing is we don’t know what will happen in these people’s lives or if they’ll find love on this incredibly silly show, but we are convinced they’ll do what we think they’ll do. This guy will break this girl’s heart. This chick will two-time this dude. But these two will love each other forever, we just know it! 

Now, I bring this up for this reason: The men and women on this show describe themselves as “confident”. And while the contestants on this show are incredibly attractive and “confident,” they all seem to be immeasurably insecure. Why do people who have seemingly perfect lives act not-so-perfect after a while? Why do all the men and women on the show, who say they’re confident, eventually end up falling into the trap of insecurity? I want to judge them. I want to make fun of them. But what ends up happening is I relate to them. I’ve cried and I’ve felt hopeless. I’ve been in similar situations where I am controlled by my anxieties and I put my faith in one human or one thing, and I don’t let go. But that’s the problem. Dating or otherwise, we create our own idols through other people, items, experiences, you name it. The question is: what do we put our confidence in — ourselves, others, or God?

Paul gives us his prayer for us in Philippians 1:6: 

“And I am certain that God, who began a good work within you, will continue his work until it is finally finished on the day when Christ returns.” 

The question is: what do we put our confidence in — ourselves, others, or God?

Yes, get it, Paul! With words like this, it leads me to ask: Where does our insecurity come from? On Love Island, the “islanders” are insecure because of their future with their partners. They are insecure because they are stuck with another person’s poor decision-making skills. They are insecure because they are unsure if their journey on the Island will end with or without their boo. What Paul is asking here is that we take confidence in what God has for us. We are required to let go of any insecurities, for we know God has a plan and purpose for our lives. I know for a fact that I struggle with anxiety about my future on a daily basis. What do we have to fear? What do the islanders have to fear? We are afraid of getting hurt. We are afraid of the pain we would have to endure, and often we endure it alone. We are afraid of losing others, making the wrong choices, and afraid of being rejected. These are all worthy concerns. However, God tells us, through Paul, that we must trust Him no matter the insecurity.

Whatever you are worried about today, God will make a way. God will work within you to finish His work, in whatever way He will. I’ve heard this phrase a million times now, but it is true; “Let go, and let God,” (Easy for the internet to say). But what God wants to hear from us about all our worries, all our troubles, all our insecurities. Pray to God and ask Him to lift your burdens off your shoulders. They are not yours to carry, anyway. That’s a good thing! As we all know, life can get heavy. We are not meant to carry it alone. Let go of your insecurities and let God fill you with confidence in His plan for your life. Paul was certain. Let us be certain, too.

By Sasha Sousa

Sasha Sousa is a job coach for people with disabilities and a leader with Kids Jr at Love Church. She has a passion for Jesus, children, mental health, and dancing at any given moment.

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